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Titre du document / Document title

Using remote sensing to inform conservation status assessment : Estimates of recent deforestation rates on New Britain and the impacts upon endemic birds

Auteur(s) / Author(s)

BUCHANAN Graeme M. (1) ; BUTCHART Stuart H. M. (2) ; DUTSON Guy (3) ; PILGRIM John D. (4) ; STEININGER Marc K. (5) ; BISHOP K. David (6) ; MAYAUX Philippe (7) ;

Affiliation(s) du ou des auteurs / Author(s) Affiliation(s)

(1) Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, 25 Rauelston Terrace, Edinburgh EH4 3TP, ROYAUME-UNI
(2) BirdLife International, Well brook Court, Girton Road, Cambridge CB3 0NA, ROYAUME-UNI
(3) Birds Australia, 60 Leicester Street, Carlton, Vic 3053, AUSTRALIE
(4) BirdLife International in Indochina, 4/209 Doi Can, Ba Dinh, Hanoi, VIET NAM
(5) Conservation International, 1919 M Street, NW Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, ETATS-UNIS
(6) 'Semioptera' Pty Ltd., P.O. Box 1234, Armidale, NSW 2350, AUSTRALIE
(7) Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, TP 440, 2120 Ispra, ITALIE

Résumé / Abstract

Remote sensing is increasingly used by policy-makers and conservationists to identify conservation priorities and changes in land cover. This is particularly important in the biodiverse tropics, where there are often few field data. Conservation action is often directed towards areas containing globally threatened species, but there have been few attempts to improve assessments of species' extinction risk through remote sensing. Here, in a novel approach we use deforestation estimates, measured through satellite imagery, to assess the conservation status of an entire endemic avifauna, based on IUCN Red List criteria. The island of New Britain, east of New Guinea, is of very high global conservation importance, and home to 37 endemic or restricted-range bird species. Analysis suggests 12% of forest cover was lost between 1989 and 2000, including over 20% of forest under 100 m altitude, with substantial areas cleared for commercial oil palm plantations. Application of the IUCN Red List criteria to these new data on area of remaining forest and rates of deforestation indicates that many species are more threatened than previously realised, with the total number of threatened or near threatened species increasing from 12 to 21. Thus, this study highlights the urgency of establishing and effectively managing protected areas in suitable lowland forests of New Britain. More broadly, it demonstrates another potential of remote sensing to assist strategic conservation decisions.

Revue / Journal Title

Biological conservation    ISSN  0006-3207   CODEN BICOBK 

Source / Source

2008, vol. 141, no1, pp. 56-66 [11 page(s) (article)] (1 p.)

Langue / Language

Anglais

Editeur / Publisher

Elsevier, Kidlington, ROYAUME-UNI  (1968) (Revue)

Mots-clés anglais / English Keywords

Vertebrata

;

IUCN Red List

;

Environmental protection

;

Loss

;

Forests

;

Aves

;

Endemic species

;

Deforestation

;

Status

;

Conservation

;

Space remote sensing

;

Mots-clés français / French Keywords

Vertebrata

;

Liste Rouge UICN

;

Nouvelle Guinée

;

Ile Nouvelle Bretagne

;

Protection environnement

;

Perte

;

Forêt

;

Aves

;

Espèce endémique

;

Déboisement

;

Statut

;

Conservation

;

Télédétection spatiale

;

Mots-clés espagnols / Spanish Keywords

Vertebrata

;

Protección medio ambiente

;

Pérdida

;

Bosque

;

Aves

;

Especie endémica

;

Deforestación

;

Estatuto

;

Conservación

;

Teledetección espacial

;

Mots-clés d'auteur / Author Keywords

Forest loss

;

IUCN Red List

;

Landsat

;

New Guinea

;

Oil palm

;

Remote sensing

;

Localisation / Location

INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 14169, 35400017435034.0060

Nº notice refdoc (ud4) : 19903878



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