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Titre du document / Document title

Evolution, biogeography, and patterns of diversification in passerine birds

Auteur(s) / Author(s)

ERICSON Per G. P. (1) ; IRESTEDT Martin (1) ; JOHANSSON Ulf S. (1) ;

Affiliation(s) du ou des auteurs / Author(s) Affiliation(s)

(1) Department of Vertebrate Zoology and Molecular Systematics Laboratory, Swedish Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 50007, 104 05 Stockholm, SUEDE

Résumé / Abstract

This paper summarizes and discusses the many new insights into passerine evolution gained from an increased general interest in avian evolution among biologists, and particularly from the extensive use of DNA sequence data in phylogenetic reconstruction. The sister group relationship between the New Zealand rifleman and all other passerines, indicates the importance of the former southern supercontinent Gondwana in the earliest evolution of this group. Following the break-up of Gondwana, the ancestors of other major passerine groups became isolated in Australia (oscines), South America (New World suboscines), and possibly, the then connected Kerguelen Plateau/India/Madagascar tectonic plates (Old World suboscines). The oscines underwent a significant radiation in the Australo-Papuan region and only a few oscine lineages have spread further than to the nearby Southeast Asia. A remarkable exception is the ancestor to the vast Passerida radiation, which now comprises 35% of all bird species. This group obviously benefitted greatly from the increased diversity in plant seed size and morphology during the Tertiary. The lyrebirds (and possibly scrub-birds) constitute the sister group to all other oscines, which renders Corvida (sensu Sibley and Ahlquist 1990) paraphyletic. Sequence data suggests that Passerida, the other Glade of oscines postulated based on the results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, is monophyletic, and that the rockfowl and rock-jumpers are the most basal members of this clade. The suboscines in the Old World (Eurylamides) and the New World (Tyrannides), respectively, are sister groups. A provisional, working classification of the passerines is presented based on the increased understanding of the major patterns of passerine evolution.

Revue / Journal Title

Journal of avian biology    ISSN  0908-8857 

Source / Source

2003, vol. 34, no1, pp. 3-15 [13 page(s) (article)] (1 p.3/4)

Langue / Language

Anglais

Editeur / Publisher

Blackwell, Oxford, ROYAUME-UNI  (1994) (Revue)

Mots-clés anglais / English Keywords

Vertebrata

;

Aves

;

World

;

Classification

;

Phylogeny

;

DNA

;

Nucleotide sequence

;

Biological evolution

;

Biogeography

;

Mots-clés français / French Keywords

Vertebrata

;

Aves

;

Passeriformes

;

Monde

;

Classification

;

Phylogenèse

;

DNA

;

Séquence nucléotide

;

Evolution biologique

;

Biogéographie

;

Mots-clés espagnols / Spanish Keywords

Vertebrata

;

Aves

;

Mundo

;

Clasificación

;

Filogénesis

;

DNA

;

Secuencia nucleótido

;

Evolución biológica

;

Biogeografía

;

Localisation / Location

INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 15962, 35400011804433.0010

Nº notice refdoc (ud4) : 14765985



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