RefDoc
Haut

Faire une nouvelle recherche
Make a new search
Lancer la recherche


Titre du document / Document title

How many kinds of consciousness?

Auteur(s) / Author(s)

ROSENTHAL David M. (1 2) ;

Affiliation(s) du ou des auteurs / Author(s) Affiliation(s)

(1) Program in Philosophy, Neuroscience, and Psychology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, ETATS-UNIS
(2) Philosophy and Cognitive Science, City University of New York Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016-4309, ETATS-UNIS

Résumé / Abstract

Ned Block's influential distinction between phenomenal and access consciousness has become a staple of current discussions of consciousness. It is not often noted, however, that his distinction tacitly embodies unargued theoretical assumptions that favor some theoretical treatments at the expense of others. This is equally so for his less widely discussed distinction between phenomenal consciousness and what he calls reflexive consciousness. I argue that the distinction between phenomenal and access consciousness, as Block draws it, is untenable. Though mental states that have qualitative character plainly differ from those with no mental qualities, a mental state's being conscious is the same property for both kinds of mental state. For one thing, as Block describes access consciousness, that notion does not pick out any property that we intuitively count as a mental state's being conscious. But the deeper problem is that Block's notion of phenomenal consciousness, or phenomenality, is ambiguous as between two very different mental properties. The failure―to distinguish these results in the begging of important theoretical questions. Once the two kinds of phenomenality have been distinguished, the way is clear to explain qualitative consciousness by appeal to a model such as the higher-order-thought hypothesis.

Revue / Journal Title

Consciousness and cognition    ISSN  1053-8100 

Source / Source

2002, vol. 11, no4, pp. 653-665 [13 page(s) (article)]

Langue / Language

Anglais

Editeur / Publisher

Elsevier, Amsterdam, PAYS-BAS  (1992) (Revue)

Mots-clés anglais / English Keywords

Human

;

Cognition

;

Philosophical aspect

;

Consciousness

;

Theory

;

Critical study

;

Mots-clés français / French Keywords

Homme

;

Cognition

;

Aspect philosophique

;

Conscience

;

Théorie

;

Etude critique

;

Mots-clés espagnols / Spanish Keywords

Hombre

;

Cognición

;

Aspecto filosófico

;

Conciencia

;

Teoría

;

Estudio crítico

;

Localisation / Location

INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 22612, 35400010574748.0120

Nº notice refdoc (ud4) : 14435510



Faire une nouvelle recherche
Make a new search
Lancer la recherche
Bas