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Titre du document / Document title

Body image, body size, and samoan ecological and individual modernization

Auteur(s) / Author(s)

BREWIS A. A. (1) ; MCGARVEY S. T. (2) ;

Affiliation(s) du ou des auteurs / Author(s) Affiliation(s)

(1) Department of Anthropology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-1619, ETATS-UNIS
(2) Departments of Medicine and Community Health, Brown University School of Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI02906, ETATS-UNIS

Résumé / Abstract

Idealization of slim bodies is a powerful cultural value in economically advantaged Western societies, and this value appears to be taking global dimensions. To examine the relationship between increasing ecological and individual modernity and acculturation to slim ideals, Samoans living in three environments with different degrees of modernization (Samoa, American Samoa, Auckland) were compared on actual and perceptual measures of body size. Women in more ecologically modern settings selected significantly slimmer ideal body sizes, and they also had the largest bodies on average. One significant finding is that the value placed on slim ideal bodies was less pronounced among Samoans who live in environments where they represent the dominant ethnic group. However, disregarding setting, Samoan women who engaged in non-traditional occupations displayed slimmer ideals than those with traditional women's occupations, but had the same mean body sizes. The male pattern is distinct from that of women, as men in both more and less modernized ecologies selected similar mean ideal sizes of male bodies. Men in non-traditional occupations and those with more education idealized larger male bodies than their peers, and also had greater average body size. The Samoan case indicates that acculturation to slim ideals may occur rapidly and can occur without the increase in body size that is generally associated with biological modernization of populations. Further, the relationship between modernizing ecologies and changing body image in Samoans appears to be highly sex-specific, influencing women to a greater degree.

Revue / Journal Title

Ecology of food and nutrition    ISSN  0367-0244   CODEN ECFNBN 

Source / Source

2000, vol. 39, no2, pp. 105-120 (2 p.1/2)

Langue / Language

Anglais

Editeur / Publisher

Taylor & Francis, Philadelphia, PA, ETATS-UNIS  (1971) (Revue)

Mots-clés anglais / English Keywords

Modernization

;

Body image

;

Body size

;

Adipose tissue

;

Body mass index

;

Ethnic origin

;

Obesity

;

Nutritional status

;

Comparative study

;

Population

;

Human

;

Samoa

;

New Zealand

;

United States

;

Corporal biometry

;

Anthropometry

;

Sociocultural environment

;

Nutrition disorder

;

Polynesia

;

Oceania

;

North America

;

America

;

Mots-clés français / French Keywords

Modernisation

;

Image corporelle

;

Taille corporelle

;

Tissu adipeux

;

Indice masse corporelle

;

Origine ethnique

;

Obésité

;

Etat nutritionnel

;

Etude comparative

;

Population

;

Homme

;

Samoa

;

Nouvelle Zélande

;

Etats Unis

;

Biométrie corporelle

;

Anthropométrie

;

Environnement socioculturel

;

Samoan

;

Trouble nutrition

;

Polynésie

;

Océanie

;

Amérique du Nord

;

Amérique

;

Mots-clés espagnols / Spanish Keywords

Modernización

;

Imagen corporal

;

Talla corporal

;

Tejido adiposo

;

Indice masa corporal

;

Origen étnico

;

Obesidad

;

Estado nutricional

;

Estudio comparativo

;

Población

;

Hombre

;

Samoa

;

Nueva Zelandia

;

Estados Unidos

;

Biometría corporal

;

Antropometría

;

Medio ambiente sociocultural

;

Trastorno nutricíon

;

Polinesia

;

Oceania

;

America del norte

;

America

;

Localisation / Location

INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 15579, 35400009080079.0010

Nº notice refdoc (ud4) : 1439117



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