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Titre du document / Document title

Phages and their application against drug-resistant bacteria

Auteur(s) / Author(s)

CHANISHVILI N. (1) ; CHANISHVILI T. (1) ; TEDIASHVILI M. (1) ; BARROW P. A. (2) ;

Affiliation(s) du ou des auteurs / Author(s) Affiliation(s)

(1) George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology, Georgian Academy of Sciences, Tbilisi, GEORGIE
(2) Institute for Animal Health, Compton, Newbury, Berkshire R620 7NN, ROYAUME-UNI

Résumé / Abstract

At the beginning of the 20th century the phenomenon of spontaneous bacterial lysis was discovered independently by Twort and d'Herelle. Despite the suggestion at that time by d'Herelle that these agents might be applied to the control of bacterial diseases in the west this idea was explored in a desultory fashion only and was eventually discarded largely due to the advent of extensive antibiotic usage. However, interest was maintained in countries of the former Soviet Union where bacteriophage therapy has been applied extensively since that time. Central to this work was the Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology in Tbilisi, Georgia, which was founded in 1923 through the joint efforts of d'Herelle and the Georgian George Eliava. Ironically, given his contributions to public health in the Soviet Union, Eliava was branded as an enemy ofthe people in 1937 and executed, d'Herelle never again returned to Georgia. In spite of these tragic events this institute remained the focus for phage therapy in the world and despite being continuously active in this field for 75 years, now struggles for its financial life. In the Eliava Institute, phages were sought for bacterial pathogens implicated in disease outbreaks in different parts of the Soviet Union and were dispatched for use in hospitals throughout the country. Although infections caused by a wide variety of bacterial pathogens have been treated, much of this has been published in Russian and is not readily available in the west. Work has also been carried out in Poland over many years and this has only recently been published in English. By contrast, interest in the west has been limited to a small number of enthusiasts and academics and until very recently little interest has been shown. The main reason that the medical and scientific communities are now beginning to take notice, is the continuing world-wide rise in the incidence of multiply-antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens and the absence of effective means for their control. Recent publicity over the work of the Eliava Institute has concentrated the minds of the western world on the potential for infectious disease control that bacteriophage offer, a procedure that is biologically more acceptable than antibiotic use and which has been in use for several decades already.

Revue / Journal Title

Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology    ISSN  0268-2575   CODEN JCTBDC 

Source / Source

Congrès
SCI Biotechnology Group. Meeting, London , ROYAUME-UNI (13/07/2000)
2001, vol. 76, no 7, pp. 662-699 (69 ref.), pp. 689-699

Langue / Language

Anglais

Editeur / Publisher

Wiley, Chichester, ROYAUME-UNI  (1986) (Revue)

Mots-clés anglais / English Keywords

Phage

;

Bacteriosis

;

Treatment

;

Prevention

;

Method

;

Combined treatment

;

Chemotherapy

;

Antibiotic

;

Review

;

Virus

;

Infection

;

Mots-clés français / French Keywords

Bactériophage

;

Bactériose

;

Traitement

;

Prévention

;

Méthode

;

Traitement associé

;

Chimiothérapie

;

Antibiotique

;

Article synthèse

;

Souche résistante antibiotique

;

Virus

;

Infection

;

Mots-clés espagnols / Spanish Keywords

Phage

;

Bacteriosis

;

Tratamiento

;

Prevención

;

Método

;

Tratamiento asociado

;

Quimioterapia

;

Antibiótico

;

Artículo síntesis

;

Virus

;

Infección

;

Localisation / Location

INIST-CNRS, Cote INIST : 560, 35400009850182.0060

Nº notice refdoc (ud4) : 1096871



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